What’s Going On Now

Justin RemesAssistant Professor, LiteraturePresenting his research at the University of Amsterdam and the University of Groningen in May 2020
"Absence in Cinema: Naomi Uman and the Peekaboo Principle."
To create her 1999 film removed, Naomi Uman used nail polish and bleach to erase the women from a German pornographic film of the 1970s. In this talk, Justin Remes argues that removed foregrounds the centrality of both scopophilia (the pleasure derived from looking) and phonophilia (the pleasure derived from hearing) in the cinematic encounter. He also argues that removed exploits what the neuroscientist V.S. Ramachandran has called “the peekaboo principle,” a psychological mechanism that leads humans to find images more enticing when they are hidden from view.
Gloria Betcher



Adjunct Associate Professor, Literature
Gloria Betcher has been appointed to a second term as Chair of the National League of Cities (NLC) University Communities Council, which develops creative solutions to the unique challenges facing university cities. Betcher has been on the Ames City Council since 2014.
Jo Mackiewicz , Professor, Rhetoric & Professional Communication and Zachary Gasior, PhD StudentConference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), March 28, 2020, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Student Contributions through Very Long Turns in Writing Center Tutoring Sessions
We examined very long turns (VLTs) in 16 writing center conferences involving eight experienced and trained native-English speaking (NES) tutors, eight NES student writers, and eight non-native English speaking (NNES) student writers. First, we determined the frequency of NES and NNES student writers’ VLTs and, second, we examined the content of the VLTs. Third, to determine whether tutor questions or tutoring strategies seemed to trigger VLTs, we analyzed the talk that preceded NESs’ and NNESs’ VLTs.
Jo Mackiewicz Professor, RPC
New book published
Theories and Methods of Writing Center Studies: A Practical Guide Jo Mackiewicz and Rebecca Day Babcock, editors.
Theories and Methods of Writing Center Studies helps students and researchers understand the foundations of writing center studies in order to make sound decisions about the types of methods and theoretical lenses that will help them formulate and answer their research questions. In the edited collection, accomplished writing center researchers discuss the theories and methods that have enabled their work, providing readers with a useful and accessible guide to developing research projects that interest them and make a positive contribution. It is ideal for courses on writing center studies and pedagogy and important reading for researchers and administrators in writing centers and writing across the curriculum or writing in the disciplines programs.
Matthew W. SivilsProfessor, LiteratureArticle published in the Journal of the Georgia Philological Association
‘Lusty as Nature’: Whitman’s Environmental Eroticism
The article is an examination of how Whitman’s poetry employs imagery of human and non-human sexuality to creates an environmental eroticism that functions not only as an anthropomorphized sexual surrogate, but also as a reminder of our literal physical connection to the larger ecosystem.
Ana McCrackenMFA in Creative Writing and EnvironmentThe Micro-Memoir: Writing for the Moment -- March 30 - May 4.
This course will focus on “making the most of a moment.” Drawn from personal experiences—quirky memories, meeting a beloved, witnessing a tragedy—we will write memoir in short form. (Max: 750 words.) Through generative in-class writing, and group workshopping (critiquing) of pieces written at home, participants will explore techniques of writing that lend themselves to short-form memoir. Shortform memoirs, later combined, can create snapshots of a life story
Allison JustusMFA in Creative Writing and EnvironmentMidwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference, February 21-22, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
"Rebellion, Devotion, Elation: Feminist Renditions of Biblical Texts"
I presented research-informed poetry from an ongoing feminist midrash project. Midrash is an ancient Hebrew practice of interrogating sacred texts through theological, ethical, and inter-textual reasoning; midrash often results in the construction of new narratives to explain or even contest the established narrative. My poetry centers the experiences of women often relegated to the margins of Judeo-Christian religious narratives; this presentation focused on Hagar, Bath-Jephthah, and Hannah, all women in the Hebrew Bible.
Susan YagerMorrill Professor, EnglishChapter published in a new book.
“Playing with the Rhythms of Chaucer’s Poetry,” forthcoming in The Once and Future Classroom.
Jo Mackiewicz and Rebecca Day Babcock, editorsProfessor, RPC"Theories and Methods of Writing Center Studies: A Practical Guide" New book published by Routledge
Theories and Methods of Writing Center Studies helps students and researchers understand the foundations of writing center studies in order to make sound decisions about the types of methods and theoretical lenses that will help them formulate and answer their research questions. In the edited collection, accomplished writing center researchers discuss the theories and methods that have enabled their work, providing readers with a useful and accessible guide to developing research projects that interest them and make a positive contribution. It is ideal for courses on writing center studies and pedagogy and important reading for researchers and administrators in writing centers and writing across the curriculum or writing in the disciplines programs.
Fatemeh BordbarjavidiPhD student in Applied Linguistics and TechnologyAmerican Association for Applied Linguistics Conference, march 28, 2020
One of the facilitators for the Student Council Lunch Event, "Balancing the Holistic Experience of Being a Graduate Student"