4.3 PhD in Rhetoric and Professional Communication (RPC)

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4.3.1 RPC Degree Requirements
4.3.2 RPC Curricular Policies and Guidelines
4.3.3 RPC Portfolio Assessment: Qualifying Examination
4.3.4 RPC Preliminary Examination
4.3.4a RPC Preliminary Comprehensive Written Examination
4.3.4b RPC Dissertation Proposal and Prospectus
4.3.4c RPC Preliminary Oral Specialized Examination
4.3.5 RPC Dissertation Guidelines
4.3.6 RPC Final Oral Defense of Dissertation (Final Oral Examination)
4.3.7 RPC Student Learning Outcomes

4.3.1 RPC Degree Requirements

  • Complete the doctoral degree within five years (seven years if admitted with only a bachelor’s degree)
  • Complete 72 credit hours of graduate coursework beyond the BA or BS. These hours must include one 600-level RPC course taken at ISU, not including 602.
Area of CourseworkCoursesCredits
CORE COURSEWORK
Engl 506
Engl 508
Engl/Sp Cm 547
Engl/Sp Cm 548
12
RPC ELECTIVES
Students may complete courses in one area or in any combination of the listed areas.
Multimodal composition and speech communication
Engl 500, SP CM 513,
Engl 503, 504, 603, 631,
Engl/Sp Cm 592B*
Professional communication
Engl 505, 529, 542, 549, 586, 587, Engl/Sp Cm 592C*
Rhetoric
Engl 586, Engl 611*, Engl/Sp Cm 592A*

*Courses are repeatable
18
RESEARCH METHODS
Engl 602 cannot be used to fulfill the program’s requirement to complete at least one 600-level RPC course at Iowa State University.
Engl 501
And two courses from:
Engl 602A Qualitative
Engl 602B Quantitative
Engl 602C Rhetorical Analysis
9
ENGLISH ELECTIVES
A set of courses (15 credits) from a coherent assembly of courses within the English Department (and may include RPC courses) approved by the POS Committee.
15
OUTSIDE ENGLISH ELECTIVES
A set of courses (6 credits) from a coherent assembly of courses outside the English Department approved by the POS Committee.
6
Note: The POS must include at least one 600-level RPC course taken at Iowa State University (cannot be transfer credits). This course may not include Engl 602, but can include an RPC Elective, English Elective, or Outside English Elective.
DISSERTATION RESEARCHEngl 699 12
TOTAL 72 minimum
  • Pass both a portfolio assessment and (following the completion of coursework) the preliminary examinations.

Note: The prelims consist of two components: a comprehensive written examination and a specialized oral preliminary examination.

  • Write and defend a dissertation that makes a contribution to the discipline.

Prerequisites

  • a Master’s degree from an accredited institution.
  • a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. Each year, the RPC program will consider for admission a limited number of students with bachelor’s degrees. These students must meet doctoral-level application requirements for GRE scores and writing ability, as shown in the GRE Analytical Writing score, as well as in submitted writing samples. Letters of recommendation must attest to the student’s ability to do doctoral level work.

*Students entering with a bachelor’s degree will take the portfolio assessment in or before their fourth semester of graduate study and will have two chances to pass. If the student fails, s/he can elect to write a thesis/creative component in their last semester and receive the M.A. degree in RCPC. Those who pass will continue to move forward in the doctoral program.

4.3.2 Curricular Policies and Guidelines (RPC)

Annual reviews

Annual reviews are a means of communicating expectations, providing feedback to students, and helping students progress towards degree completion. Each graduate student will complete required documentation and submit it for review to their assigned program adviser or major professor by the announced deadline (early April) each year. The student’s assigned program advisor or major professor will determine whether or not the student has made satisfactory progress towards the benchmarks on the benchmark summary chart. Appropriate action will take place as described in the “RPC PhD Student Annual Review Process” document downloadable from the English Department graduate program Forms website or the Graduate College website.

Program of Study Committee and the POSC Form

POS Committee

The RPC PhD Program of Study (POS) committee consists of at least five members of the ISU Graduate Faculty with a minimum of three faculty members (including the major professor) from within your major. Below are specific requirements for the composition of the committee (See committee make-up for co-majors if applicable.):

  • It must include three members, including the major professor, from within your major area.
  • It must include a fourth member which can be from within the major, inside the Department of English, or outside the Department of English.
  • It must include a fifth member from outside the Department of English.

A faculty member from a major area other than the student’s major may co-chair the committee. Information about English Department graduate faculty, their major areas, and their areas of research and teaching can be found in the Graduate Faculty section of this manual.

POSC Form

The Program of Study and Committee Form is required to be completed by no later than the announced deadline in your fifth semester (or the equivalent). See Program of Study Committee and the POSC Form (PhD) for more information.

POS Categories

RPC Electives

Students may complete courses in one area or combination of these areas: multimodal composition and speech communication, professional communication, and rhetoric.

Research Methods

Students must choose two of three research methods courses in Engl 602.
Note: 602 cannot be used to fulfill the program’s requirement to complete one 600-level course at ISU.

  • Engl 602A. Qualitative
  • Engl 602B. Quantitative
  • Engl 602C. Rhetorical analysis

English Electives (including RPC)

Students will select a set of courses (15 credits) from a coherent assembly of courses within English (including additional RPC courses) to be approved by the POS committee.

Outside English Electives

Students will select a set of courses (6 credits) from a coherent assembly of courses outside English to be approved by the POS committee.

600-level courses

The POS must include at least one 600-level RPC course taken at ISU (cannot be transfer credits). This course may not include Engl 602, but can include an RPC elective, English elective, or outside English elective.

Transfer credits

Doctoral students must complete a minimum of 36 graduate credits at Iowa State University. Students may transfer up to 36 credits, but the actual number of transfer credits approved will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Requests for transfer credit consideration must be made by completing the Transfer Credit Petition form accompanied by required paperwork. Refer to the section regarding transfer credits earlier in this manual for more information.

4.3.3 RPC Portfolio Assessment: Qualifying Examination (RPC)

Doctoral candidates in Rhetoric and Professional Communication must submit a portfolio for diagnostic assessment of their scholarly writing.

All candidates for the PhD in Rhetoric and Professional Communication must submit a portfolio for assessment no later than the announced deadline in their third semester in the program (not including summer terms; fourth semester if admitted with a bachelor’s degree). Failure to do so will constitute lack of satisfactory progress toward the degree.

The RPC Examinations Committee consists of four RPC faculty members and sets the precise deadlines each semester. Portfolios will be evaluated twice a year (fall and spring semesters only). The dates will be posted on the graduate program Deadlines website by the Graduate Program Staff Assistant no later than the third week of the fall semester.

If for any reason you wish to request a change in the procedure for the portfolio assessment (for example: extending the deadline), you must make a written request to the DOGE before the second Tuesday of the semester in which the exam is due, specifying the request and providing a rationale for it. The DOGE will decide if such requests will be granted. The chair of the RPC program area and the chair of the RPC Examinations Committee will be advised of the request made if approved by the DOGE. Normally, extensions are not granted except in extenuating circumstances.

Purpose

The portfolio presents your best scholarly work in the discipline of rhetoric and professional communication up to this point. The portfolio assessment

  • determines your readiness to complete research and writing tasks in the discipline,
  • evaluates your proficiency in academic writing, and
  • gives you feedback on your potential for achieving the PhD.

Preparation

To prepare for the portfolio exam, you will, at the end of your first academic year, receive collective advice from RPC graduate faculty with whom they have studied so far. During an RPC faculty meeting at the end of the academic year, faculty with whom you have studied will provide oral feedback to your assigned program adviser on the strengths of your work so far, how you might improve, and what courses you might consider in the future. The adviser will then be responsible for meeting with you to present a written summary of this advice so that you can begin preparing for the portfolio assessment. In preparing for the assessment, you are also encouraged to seek more detailed advice from other professors, as well as peers.

Submission requirements

You will choose representative samples of your work to include in the portfolio according to the following requirements. The entire portfolio should be no shorter than 25 pages and no longer than 50 pages.

You are encouraged to consult with your adviser, as well as your peers and professors, about selecting and revising the appropriate artifacts in order to demonstrate a range of academic interests and abilities. When revising your work, instructor’s comments and grades should be removed. You are encouraged to respond to previous feedback from professors and refine your ideas to reflect your most current thinking about the subject matter and demonstrate your ability to communicate clearly in an academic style.

  • Submit three papers as a single typewritten Microsoft Word or PDF document in the order below, double-spaced, 12-point font format. To ensure that your electronic file is anonymous, you should remove your name from the papers and file via the author identification from the properties for each file (i.e., in Windows, right click on the file> “Properties” > “Details” > “Remove Properties and Personal Information”). You should also realize that members of the RPC Examinations Committee may recognize papers even after your name has been removed because they know your work. In lieu of this identification, you choose one five-digit identification number that you will use for all three papers.
    1. Submit a 1,000- to 1,500-word reflection paper which explains the contents of the portfolio in terms of how it reflects your intellectual development in the program so far. It should also be used to highlight possible paths for forthcoming research. You are encouraged to consult with peers, professors, and assigned program advisers about this portfolio overview.
    2. Submit two artifacts of your choice, drawn from materials produced in an RPC master’s or doctoral course at Iowa State University. At least one of these artifacts must have originated in an RPC doctoral course. These materials might include such artifacts as book reviews, conference presentations, research articles, scholarly websites, and other evidence of scholarly expertise, but must keep in mind the criteria listed in the “Evaluation” section below.
  • Each paper must include title pages with the following information:
    1. The same student-selected 5-digit identification number for all 3 papers;
    2. One of the following three titles clearly identifying which paper it represents:

A) “Reflection Paper”

B) “Artifact 1”

C) “Artifact 2”

  • The file name for the combined single document must follow the following format:
         RPC.Port.Term20XXa.YYYYY
    (“Term” is replaced by Fall or Spring; X’s are replaced by year; Y’s are replaced by the student-selected 5-digit identification number).
  • Upload the combined single electronic Microsoft Word or PDF portfolio document to the RPC Portfolio Assessment: STUDENT SUBMISSIONS folder in CyBox (students will have upload only access so you cannot view or access other submissions).
  • Download from the Forms website under “Program Specific Forms and Documents” the PhD Portfolio Assessment: STUDENT ID Memo document, fill it out with the requested information, and save it with a file name following the required file name format:
         RPC.Port.Term20XXa.ID.YYYYY
    (“Term” is replaced by fall or spring; X’s are replaced by year; Y’s are replaced by the student-selected 5-digit identification number.)
  • Upload the completed STUDENT ID MEMO document as a separate Microsoft Work or PDF document to the RPC Portfolio Assessment: STUDENT ID Folder in CyBox (students will have upload only access so you cannot access other submissions).
  • The Graduate Program Staff Assistant will place the student portfolio submissions in the RPC Portfolio Assessment: Exams Committee Review folder in CyBox for the committee to evaluate submissions.
  • The appropriate assigned program advisers will also be given access to the RPC Portfolio Assessment: Exams Committee Review folder in CyBox. The Graduate Program Staff Assistant will email each of them regarding the Student ID number for their advisee’s portfolio submission in order for them to participate in the evaluation.
  • If your assigned program adviser also sits on the RPC Examinations Committee, another appropriate person will be selected from the RPC faculty at large, to augment the RPC Examinations Committee.
  • The RPC Examinations Committee chair will request access be given to the RPC Portfolio Assessment: STUDENT ID folder in CyBox by contacting the Graduate Program Staff Assistant only after evaluations and decisions are completed in order to communicate results to students correctly according to the student-selected 5-digit identification numbers.

Evaluation

The RPC Examinations Committee members and the assigned program advisers will access the student portfolio documents in CyBox. If your assigned program adviser also sits on the RPC Examinations Committee, another appropriate person will be selected from the RPC faculty at large, to augment the committee. Your assigned program adviser attends the evaluation meeting and participates in the discussion but does not vote on the success or failure of your portfolio.

Portfolios will be evaluated according to these criteria:

  • Proficiency in academic writing. Regardless of the mode, genre, or medium submitted, you must display graduate-level ability to
    1. Define a problem or issue
    2. Make and support claims and subclaims
    3. Cite and synthesize sources
    4. Sustain a coherent argument, and
    5. Use standard scholarly conventions.
  • Ability to explain and contextualize scholarship in the introductory overview for the exam
  • Potential promise for completing work for the degree

Results

After a portfolio has been evaluated, the RPC Examinations Committee will rate it as either pass or fail. The RPC Examinations Committee chair will request access be given to the RPC Portfolio Assessment: STUDENT ID folder in CyBox by contacting the Graduate Program Staff Assistant only after evaluations and decisions are completed in order to communicate results to the appropriate students according to the five-digit student-selected identification numbers. A letter communicating the results as well as a written rationale for the decision will be provided to you within one week of the evaluation meeting. A copy of the results letter and rationale will be uploaded by the RPC Examinations Committee to the RPC Portfolio Assessment: Exams Committee Evaluation folder in CyBox following the file name format:
     RPC.Port.Term.20XXa.Results.LnameFname
(“Term” is replaced by Fall or Spring; X’s are replaced by year; “a” represents first submission; “Results” is replaced by Pass or NoPass)

At their discretion, program advisers can notify students immediately of the committee’s decision; however, relaying the decision this swiftly is not required. Your adviser and one member of the RPC Examinations Committee must meet with you in a face-to-face meeting as soon as possible after you receive written notification of the results to discuss the written rationale and to provide additional feedback on your scholarly writing.

Second portfolio submission

In the case of a portfolio that does not show sufficient mastery of the scholarly writing essential for achieving the PhD, you will be asked to submit a second portfolio, which, at the direction of the RPC Examinations Committee, may include different papers and analyses, or revisions of one or both of the original papers. This second portfolio must be submitted by the announced deadline following the same procedures and requirements the following semester (does not include summer semester). The file name for this document must follow the file name format:
     RPC.Port.Term.20XXb.YYYYY
(“Term” is replaced by Fall or Spring; X’s are replaced by year; “b” represents second submission; Y’s are replaced by the student-selected 5-digit identification number).

The same evaluation, feedback, and results procedures will be used as those for the first submission. However, the DOGE will also participate in the evaluation and discussion of the second portfolio, but only the members of the RPC Examinations Committee will vote on the success or failure of the second portfolio. The results letter and written rationale will be transmitted to you in a face-to-face meeting that will include your assigned program adviser and at least one member of the RPC Examinations Committee within two weeks of the RPC Examinations Committee’s decision. A copy of the results memo and rationale will be uploaded by the RPC Examinations Committee to the RPC Portfolio Assessment: Exams Committee Review CyBox folder following the file name format:
     RPC.Port.Term.20XXb.Results.LnameFname
(“Term” is replaced by Fall or Spring; X’s are replaced by year;”b” represents second submission; “LnameFname” is replaced by the student’s name)

You are permitted to submit portfolio papers only twice, and a passing portfolio is necessary for you to continue in the PhD program. If you do not pass the portfolio assessment, you can serve out your graduate assistantship contract for the remainder of the current semester.

Grievances regarding the portfolio assessment

If you believe that you have legitimate reasons to appeal the decision of the ALT Examinations Committee, you may follow the grievance procedure outlined in the Graduate College Handbook (see Grievances Related to Scholarly and Professional Competence).

4.3.4 RPC Preliminary Examination

Doctoral candidates in Rhetoric and Professional Communication must take the preliminary examination, which is composed of two parts—the comprehensive written examination and the specialized examination (preliminary oral examination).
Before you begin the dissertation, you will take the preliminary examination. Although this examination may be taken during the last semester of coursework, most students spend considerable time following their coursework reading and otherwise preparing for the prelims. You and your POS committee should discuss what procedures will be in place should a failure occur for all or any parts of the written or the oral preliminary examinations.

If for any reason you wish to request a change in the procedure for the preliminary examination, you must write a memo to the Director of Graduation Education before the date of the exam specifying the request and providing a rationale for it. The DOGE will decide whether or not the request will be granted.

The RPC Examinations Committee, consisting of four RPC faculty members, evaluates exam questions selected by the POS committee to ensure consistency and to provide specific advice about the focus and rigor of questions.

Upon successfully completing the written and oral parts of the preliminary examination, you will be ready to pursue work on the dissertation (see additional requirements for “ABD Status”).

Time limits and other restrictions

The Graduate College requires that your POSC Form be approved at least three months prior to the preliminary oral examination. Also, you are required to have the preliminary oral examination at least six months prior to your dissertation defense (final oral examination). Several other requirements must be met as well (see Preliminary examination requirements for more information).

Purpose and nature

The preliminary examination serves two important functions. First, it certifies that you have the general knowledge necessary to engage in conversations of the discipline. Comprehensiveness is required by both the Graduate College and the RPC program. Second, the examination helps you prepare to work on the dissertation. To fulfill these two functions, the preliminary examination consists of two parts:

The comprehensive written examination component

The comprehensive examination is the first part of the preliminary examination and consists of a written exam. There are two purposes of the comprehensive examination. The first is to demonstrate your ability to make scholarly arguments involving the comprehensive range of knowledge sufficient to engage the conversation of the discipline. The second is to prepare you to write a dissertation proposal and pursue dissertation research.

The specialized examination component (preliminary oral examination)

The specialized examination is the second part of the preliminary examination and consists of both written and oral components. The specialized exam also serves as the university’s Preliminary Oral Examination, which is required of all PhD candidates at Iowa State University. As formulated within the English Department, the specialized exam is designed to help you prepare for dissertation work in a specific research area of your choosing. Though the format can vary widely, the specialized exam often consists of a written dissertation prospectus and reading lists on which you will give an oral presentation during a POS committee meeting.

Both types of exams are discussed in further detail in the following sections of this document.

4.3.4a RPC Preliminary comprehensive written examination component

Overview of comprehensive written examination

The comprehensive examination is a multi-stage process that takes approximately a semester to complete. To accurately determine an appropriate timeline for this process, you need to consult with your major professor to ensure that you have scheduled a proper amount of time between the events in the process. The overview that appears below is followed by more detailed sections about various stages of the process.

  1. Checking for Program of Study and Committee Form (POSC) Approval Status— Check that your POSC Form is approved by the Graduate College by checking your AccessPlus account. Changes to your POS committee membership or revisions in your POS coursework that were originally approved on your POSC Form must be modified in AccessPlus. Make changes to the POSC Form and select “Submit for approval” to route changes through your major professor, POS committee members, the DOGE, and the Graduate College for final approval. No part of the preliminary examination process should begin until all changes are approved.
  2. Checking potential exam dates—Discuss potential exam dates with POS committee members and determine possible dates for taking the exam (see “Scheduling the written comprehensive exam” later in this section).
    • Before setting dates, be aware that certain restrictions exist concerning scheduling dates and times for the exam. You should keep in mind that most faculty members will not be available during semester breaks and University Holidays to read and evaluate exams.
    • Summer exams—Because faculty are not available during the summer to evaluate exams and because we want to avoid long delays in completing evaluations, you may not submit comprehensive exams for evaluation during the summer. They may, however, be turned in during the first week of fall semester. Effectively, this means that students can receive comprehensive exams from their major professor 17 days before the first day of fall classes.
  3. Negotiating and Submitting the Reading List—Compiling a reading list and having it approved as the basis for your exam is a dialogic process involving you, the major professor, and POS Committee. The reading list needs to be compiled and approved before exam questions are negotiated and submitted (see “Reading List” information later in this section).
    • Submitting proposed reading list—You submit a proposed reading list to your POS Committee.
    • Revising the reading list—You revise the list according to POS committee comments in line with the committee’s deadline.
    • Evaluating reading list—Your major professor submits reading list to the POS committee for its approval.
    • Finalizing reading list—Your POS committee, working with you, makes revisions and finalizes the reading list.
    • Submitting approved reading list—You submit a printed copy of the approved reading list and the RPC Reading List Approval Memo containing POS committee member original signatures to the Graduate Program Staff Assistant before you can begin the comprehensive written exam
  4. Submitting and Negotiating the Exam Questions (see “Exam questions and structure” later in this section.
    • Submitting potential exam questions—You and POS committee members submit possible exam questions to your major professor.
    • Revising and selecting exam questions—After your reading list has been approved and submitted to the Graduate Program Staff Assistant, your major professor (without your involvement) coordinates the revision and selection of exam questions with the POS committee.
    • Evaluation of exam questions by RPC Examinations Committee—Your major professor submits exam questions electronically to RPC Examinations Committee Chair for evaluation. Their evaluation is intended to ensure consistency across the comprehensive exams as well as provide the POS committee with specific advice about the focus and rigor of the questions. Unless the RPC Examinations Committee Chair announces other due dates, your major professor must submit comprehensive exam questions to the RPC Examinations Committee Chair by the first Monday of September, November, February, and April. The RPC Examinations Committee Chair returns the exam questions to the major professor with any recommendations for revision.
    • Revising exam questions—If warranted, the POS committee revises the questions (without your involvement) and the major professor constructs the final exam (using the exam template) and coordinates the starting date and time with you.
  5. Taking the Exam (see “Taking the written comprehensive exam” later in this section)
    • Receiving the exam—The major professor sends you the exam document electronically via email. The major professor uploads a copy of the exam document to your prelim exam CyBox folder (Lname, Fname: PRELIM EXAM) which is created by the Graduate Program Staff Assistant for students to upload only and POS committee members to have access).
    • Completing the exam—You have 17 days to answer the exam questions (17 days of 24-hour periods) which allows for the inclusion of three weekends, depending on the date of the exam and the day of the week it is distributed to you. You must answer three of the six questions with each answer being no longer than 3000 words or about 10 double-spaced 12-point font typewritten pages (including the reference list).
    • Returning the completed exam—By no later than the deadline, you must submit answers to three of the six questions as a single Microsoft Word or PDF document to your prelim exam CyBox folder (Lname, Fname: PRELIM EXAM). You must make sure that all pages of the exam include a running header containing the question number, your name, and page number. The file name for this document must follow the following format:
           RPC.Prelim.Term20XXa.LnameFname
  6. Evaluating the Exam (see “Evaluation criteria and process” later in this section).
    • Scheduling the evaluation committee meeting—The major professor is responsible for scheduling a meeting of your POS committee and ensuring that members are present, either in person or via distance participation.
    • Evaluating the exam—Members of your POS committee will access the documents in your prelim exam CyBox folder (Lname, Fname: PRELIM EXAM) after the deadline in order to evaluate the exam. They will meet to discuss and evaluate your exam. For you to pass, a minimum of four out of the five of your POS committee members must vote to pass the exam. If the POS committee is larger than five members, all but one of the members must vote to pass the exam.
    • Communicating the exam results—Following the POS committee’s meeting, your major professor communicates the committee decision in writing to you in person or via email and uploads a copy of the results to your prelim exam CyBox folder (Lname, Fname: PRELIM EXAM) following the file name format:
           RPC.Prelim.Term20XXa.Result.LnameFname
  7. Results
    • If you pass the comprehensive examination, the Preliminary Oral Examination can be scheduled no sooner than 2 weeks after the committee’s decision (essentially 4 weeks after the preliminary comprehensive written exam answers are submitted by the student).
    • If you do not pass the comprehensive examination, you will be required to take a second, different exam on the same reading list at a later date to be determined by your POS committee. The major professor will write commentary that identifies problems with your exam and offers you advice in preparing to take the second exam. The POS committee will approve and sign this letter within two weeks of the POS committee evaluation meeting.

Reading list

The comprehensive examination is based on a reading list you and your POS committee construct. Reading lists are considered public documents and, as such, are kept on file in the office of the Graduate Program Staff Assistant, 227 Ross Hall, where they may be viewed by faculty and students. You must submit a printed copy of the approved reading list and the RPC Reading List Approval Memo containing POS committee original signatures to the Graduate Program Staff Assistant before the comprehensive examination can begin. Each reading list should contain a comprehensive range of articles and books representing not only a cross section of the discipline but also a concentration of texts reflecting your research interest. Ideally, materials on the reading list that are not in your research area will be selected in ways that allow you to integrate your interest with the discipline as a whole. The intellectual task of integrating a specialized research interest with a list representing the discipline as a whole is not only a practical necessity for the exam but also an aid to help you understand the relation of your specialty to the field at large. Because individual reading lists will include books as well as articles and book chapters, it is impossible to specify a precise number of items required on any single comprehensive reading list. You and your POS committee will negotiate the length of individual lists within the spirit of reasonable equity and comprehensiveness. As reading lists are constructed, both you and POS committee members are encouraged to consult faculty members who have specific expertise in the dissertation subject area but who are not on your POS committee.

The reading list should be divided into approximately three to six categories. Each category should be prefaced by a brief focus statement (approximately 200-300 words) that explains the parameters or framework of each category.

Examination questions and structure of the preliminary written exam

Each comprehensive examination is constructed by your POS committee and is based on your reading list. You are expected to talk with POS committee members about your reading list and about issues that might be the topics for exam questions. The major professor will solicit questions from you and POS committee members and then construct a draft of the exam. Although your committee members may collaborate with you in the question writing process because it can be a useful learning tool, the POS committee alone will revise and select the final six questions for your exam—three of which you must answer. The major professor submits exam questions electronically to RPC Examinations Committee Chair for evaluation prior to finalizing the exam. Their evaluation is intended to ensure consistency across the comprehensive exams as well as provide the POS committee with specific advice about the focus and rigor of the questions. Unless the RPC Examinations Committee Chair announces other due dates, your major professor must submit comprehensive exam questions to the RPC Examinations Committee Chair by the first Monday of September, November, February, and April. The RPC Examinations Committee Chair returns the exam questions to the major professor with any recommendations for revision. The major professor then constructs the final version of the exam (using the exam template) and coordinates the starting date and time with you.

Evaluation committee includes all POS committee members only

The members of your POS committee, including your major professor(s), will evaluate your comprehensive exam.

Academic honesty

When taking the comprehensive examination, you may not receive any help from anyone. In order to avoid even the appearance of impropriety, do not discuss the content of exam questions while you are taking the exam.

Evaluation criteria

The comprehensive examination will be evaluated on the following criteria:

  • command of the material (e.g., depth and subtlety of understanding of concepts discussed)
  • quality of writing (e.g., coherence; clear line of argument, where points or claims are advanced and supported; professional style and format, given time constraints)
  • comprehensive coverage (e.g., demonstration across the three essays of a range of knowledge of historical periods, figures, concepts and works; avoidance of duplication—for example, prominently featuring the same figure or concept in more than one answer)
  • accuracy (e.g., accurate representation of research studies, historical and contemporary figures, theories, concepts, and terms; care in answering the questions asked—that is, responding to the question asked within the committee’s reasonable interpretation of the question)

Scheduling the preliminary comprehensive written exam

The dates on which the exam will be administered will be set by you and your major professor.  You should also keep in mind that most faculty members will not be available during semester breaks, University Holidays, or the summer to read and evaluate exams. Usually faculty are not available during the summer to evaluate exams and we want to avoid long delays in completing evaluations. Therefore, you may not submit comprehensive exams for evaluation during the summer. Effectively, this means that students can receive comprehensive exams from their major professor 17 days before the first day of fall classes (see “Checking Potential Exam Dates” earlier in this section). To accurately determine an appropriate timeline for this process, consult with your major professor to help ensure a proper amount of time is scheduled between events within the process.

Taking the preliminary comprehensive written exam

The major professor sends the exam document to you electronically via email and uploads a copy of the exam document to your prelim exam CyBox folder (Lname, Fname: PRELIM EXAM) created by the Graduate Program Staff Assistant for students to upload only and POS committee members to have access). You will have 17 days to answer the exam questions (17 days of 24-hour periods each), which allows for the inclusion of three weekends in the exam period depending on the dates of the exam and the day of the week the exam is distributed to you. You must answer three of the six questions with each answer being no longer than 3000 words or about 10 double-spaced 12-point font typewritten pages (including the reference list).

You submit answers to three of the six exam questions as a single Microsoft Word or PDF document by no later than the deadline to your prelim exam CyBox folder (Lname, Fname: PRELIM EXAM). The file name for this document must follow the following format:
     RPC.Prelim.Term20XXa.LnameFname

Evaluation process

The POS committee will access the documents in the CyBox folder. They will evaluate the exam and meet to discuss the exam as soon as possible to vote on whether the exam passes. Ideally, this will occur within two weeks of you completing the exam. Your major professor is responsible for scheduling the POS committee evaluation meeting and ensuring that all members are present, either in person or via distance participation.

Results

The comprehensive examination will be evaluated and voted on by all voting eligible faculty members of the POS committee. Passing the comprehensive examination requires that a minimum of four out of the five POS committee members vote to pass the exam. If the POS committee is larger than five members, all but one of the members must vote to pass the exam in order for you to pass.

The major professor will prepare a letter indicating if you passed the examination and share the POS committee’s commentary and provide you with a copy in person or via email and uploads a copy of the results to your prelim exam CyBox folder (Lname, Fname: PRELIM EXAM).

If you do not pass, you will be required to take a second, different exam on the same reading list at a later date determined by you and your POS committee. In the case of a failing exam, the major professor will also provide written commentary that identifies problems with your exam and offers you advice in preparing to take the second exam. The POS committee will approve and sign this letter. The major professor will provide you with a copy in person or via email and upload a copy of the results letter and commentary to the student’s prelim exam CyBox folder (Lname, Fname: PRELIM EXAM). The file name for this document must follow the following format:
     RPC.Prelim.Term20XXa.LnameFname

Second preliminary comprehensive examination submission

The same preparation, evaluation, feedback, and results procedures will be used as those for the first submission. However, this second examination will be a different exam but based on the same reading list. You must pass the preliminary comprehensive examination before taking the preliminary specialized oral examination. If you fail to pass the preliminary comprehensive examination a second time, you will be dropped from the RPC PhD program. You can serve out your graduate assistantship for the remainder of the current semester.

Grievances regarding the comprehensive examination

If you believe that you have legitimate reasons to appeal the decision of the evaluation committee, you may follow the grievance procedure outlined in the Graduate College Handbook (see “Grievances Related to Scholarly and Professional Competence”).

Relation of comprehensive examination to the specialized examination

Once you have passed the written comprehensive examination, you will take the specialized examination. Because the specialized examination is precisely that, “specialized,” and typically includes a dissertation proposal, the specialized examination will be evaluated by your POS committee.

4.3.4b RPC Dissertation proposal and prospectus

Before starting on the dissertation, develop a dissertation proposal/prospectus for POS committee approval. A prospectus typically will

  • describe the nature of your project
  • provide a rationale for your chosen dissertation option
  • provide a rationale for the project itself
  • contain a review of significant literature
  • outline and justify the research methodology
  • offer a chapter outline or equivalent indication of overall structure
  • include a bibliography
  • propose a work schedule
  • identify POS committee members by name and degree program relevant to the dissertation

Discussions with the POS committee may result in a variation of the above commonly held expectations.

After you and your major professor have finalized the dissertation proposal/prospectus, you distribute it to all members of your POS committee as the basis for the specialized preliminary oral examination. Each POS committee member must sign the Report of Preliminary Oral Examination form (see below) at the conclusion of the exam to indicate that he/she has read the dissertation proposal/prospectus and agrees that you are ready to proceed with research. This is regarded as a starting point; that is, the project as represented by the prospectus may, and probably will, change during the course of your research and writing.

4.3.4c RPC Specialized examination component: Preliminary oral examination

The specialized examination, as the second part of the preliminary examination, is the preliminary oral examination. This exam helps you prepare for dissertation work in a specific research area of your choosing. Although the preliminary oral examination will contain both written (dissertation proposal/prospectus) and oral components (specialized examination), its format can vary. Because the specialized examination as well as its administration and evaluation are the responsibility of the POS committee, you will work closely with your committee to develop a format that will reflect your particular research interests. Each POS committee member signs the Report of Preliminary Oral Examination form at the conclusion of the exam to indicate that he/she agrees that you are ready to proceed. You must pass the preliminary oral examination at least six months prior to your dissertation defense (final oral examination).

Getting your POS committee together for the preliminary oral examination

Consult with your POS committee members about convenient meeting times. The earlier you can do this, the better, since it can be difficult to arrange a time when all faculty members are available (especially in the summer). All committee members must be present for the preliminary oral exam. The Graduate College can be petitioned for permission to have 1-2 committee members (depending on the size of your committee) to participate at a distance. The distant participant must submit the Preliminary or Final Oral Examination with Committee Member at a Distance form to the Graduate College prior to the exam, provide a reason, and indicate who will sign for them at the conclusion of the exam. Graduate College approval must be granted before the exam for permanent replacements (submit a POSC Form modification in your AccessPlus account in plenty of time for routing and final approval by the Graduate College before the exam). For POS committee substitutions in the case of last minute emergencies, find a substitute that fills the same role on the POS committee as the absent member, contact the Graduate College right away, and submit a Request for Committee Substitution at the Preliminary or Final Oral Exam form. See the Graduate College Handbook for complete details and requirements.

Reserving a meeting room

Reserving a meeting room is your responsibility. This can be done by your major professor or by contacting the Graduate Program Staff Assistant for assistance. Your major professor can access the conference room schedules or you can contact the Graduate Program Staff Assistant for assistance.

Online Preliminary Oral Examination Request

After the meeting time is established, complete an Online Preliminary or Final Oral Exam Request. You must submit this request in the online system at least TWO weeks before your examination. Your major professor immediately receives an email with a link to go into the system and approve your request before it is reviewed by the Graduate College for final approval. All POS committee members receive an email for their information regarding your exam request date, time, and place. Because the request will specify the date and time of the preliminary oral examination, it should be submitted only after you have taken and passed the preliminary written exam and met all other Preliminary Examination Requirements. You and your POS committee may not hold the exam unless the Preliminary Oral Examination has been approved by the Graduate College.

Report of Preliminary Oral Examination form

The Graduate College sends the Report of Preliminary Oral Examination form to the Graduate Program Staff Assistant who prepares and provides hard copy of the form to your major professor to bring to the exam meeting.

Conducting the preliminary oral examination

According to Graduate College policy, all POS committee members must be present for the entire exam. Remember, if a POS committee member is unable to attend in the case of a last minute emergency, find a substitute that fills the same role on the POS committee as the absent member, contact the Graduate College right away, and submit a Request for Committee Substitution at the Preliminary or Final Oral Exam form. At the completion of the exam, submit the signed Report of Preliminary Oral Examination form (make sure results are marked and all required signatures have been obtained) to the Graduate Program Staff Assistant, 227 Ross Hall, who will submit the signed copy to the Graduate College reporting the results of your exam.

You must pass the preliminary oral examination at least six months prior to your dissertation defense (final oral examination). Upon successfully completing the specialized examination, you will be ready to pursue work on the dissertation (see additional requirements for “ABD Status”).

4.3.5 RPC Dissertation Guidelines

Detailed university requirements for the PhD dissertation appear in several online university documents. These online documents are the basis for the following review of university requirements.

University expectations

According to the Graduate College, a doctoral dissertation must

  • follow all requirements detailed in the Thesis Checklist
  • “demonstrate conclusively” your ability to conceive, design, conduct, and interpret independent and original research
  • demonstrate your ability to analyze, interpret, and organize data
  • be written independently (e.g., no co-authorship or joint writing)
  • make a significant contribution to the field
  • be worthy of publication in professional journals of quality or in book form

As the Graduate College Handbook points out, you, rather than the major professor or the Graduate College, are responsible for writing and editing the dissertation, as well as for completing any necessary paperwork.

Department expectations

In addition to general university expectations, there are a number of departmental expectations for students enrolled in the English Department doctoral programs. These expectations involve the dissertation prospectus, POS procedures, the structure and emphasis of the dissertation itself, and the oral defense of the dissertation.

POS procedures

You are responsible for reaching an understanding with POS committee members concerning their respective roles. In discussing member roles, you will find it useful to review such issues as

  • whether or not each committee member wants to see every draft
  • what your research and writing schedule will be
  • how drafts will be submitted (e.g., whether or not the POS chair should see each draft before it’s circulated)

Dissertation options

When selecting an option for the dissertation, you and the POS committee will need to reach a consensus regarding both the dissertation’s emphasis and structure.

Emphasis

Although dissertations in the humanities are quite varied, many RPC dissertations fall into one of the following four categories: historical, theoretical, empirical (experimental or descriptive), and hybrid. A dissertation dealing with a problem in pedagogy, for example, might be either historical, theoretical, empirical, or some combination of the three in its emphasis.

Structural options

Given the expectations of the Graduate College, there are two typical arrangement options for structuring a dissertation: specified chapter option or articles within a framework. In working with your POS committee, you may develop variations on these options or discover additional options for structuring your work.

Specified chapter option

Dissertations as described in Graduate College materials commonly have five chapters; however, the number of chapters in the dissertation can vary depending on the topic and nature of research. The chapter option might feature the traditional dissertation or a monograph. Monographs usually assume outside audiences.

For example, one version of a traditional dissertation is often organized this way:

  • Chapter One contains a contextualized statement of purpose or a problem statement, definitions/explanations of terms or concepts, articulation of critical issues, and the research question(s) that will be explored in the dissertation.
  • Chapter Two is a review of pertinent literature.
  • Chapter Three. Dissertations that include an empirical study might contain a presentation of and rationale for the methodology.
  • Chapter Four. If the dissertation includes an empirical study, this chapter might present the results and an interpretation of those results.
  • Chapter Five. If the dissertation includes an empirical study, this chapter might discuss the implications and applications of the results.

Another example of a specified chapter dissertation would be a monograph. It might have the following organization:

  • Chapter One might identify a problem or a series of related issues.
  • Chapter Two might provide a historical context for the problem or issues.
  • Chapters Three, Four, and Five might be organized topically and include a review of relevant literature as well as theoretical arguments.

Karen Burke LeFevre’s Invention as a Social Act is an example of a dissertation in monograph form. Her work, which explores a concept theoretically, is organized this way:

  • Introduction: introduces the concept and problematizes it; offers definitions and names theoretical approaches.
  • Chapter One: establishes the scope and provides overview of the study.
  • Chapter Two: develops the problem and demonstrates the inadequacy of the currently dominant theoretical approach to the problem (the Platonic view).
  • Chapter Three: demonstrates how another approach (the social perspective) might better address the problem.
  • Chapter Four: proposes that the framework offered in Chapter Three (the social perspective) supplant the currently dominant approach (the Platonic view) in our understanding of the concept; dramatizes the new perspective in action.
  • Chapter Five: discusses the argument (the problem and the proposal) in a broader theoretical context (the role of language); engages in theory-building.
  • Chapter Six: addresses implications.

There are also other alternatives available within the chapter option. For example, dissertations can include an extended narrative that incorporates all of the conventional components of other kinds of dissertations; that is, they include a statement of purpose, a review of pertinent literature, a presentation of methodology and results, a critical interpretation of findings, and a statement of significance(s). The narrative, whether embedded within the conventional dissertation components or acting as a frame for these components, must represent situations and ideas that would lose their essential character and meaning if presented outside a story framework.

It is difficult to argue that a narrative should govern a dissertation’s structure. Whereas narratives can readily be used as examples, writers have a more challenging task if they want to use narrative to shape their arguments. Nevertheless, the extended narrative option provides you with an opportunity for employing this strategy where appropriate.

Articles within a framework option

University regulations allow you, in agreement with your POS committee, to include in the dissertation individual papers submitted or to be submitted to scholarly, refereed journals.

It is very important that you discuss this option with your POS committee before planning to pursue it. Some committees, for example, might stipulate that only articles actually accepted in refereed journals will be acceptable, while other committees might disallow this option altogether.

Dissertation manuscripts that follow this option must adhere to structural and documentation standards outlined in the Thesis Checklist under “Journal Paper Format.” This option must include

  • a general introduction in which the problem and its background and significance are addressed
    •  a rationale for the inclusion of the papers
    • a statement about the organization of the dissertation
  • a literature review
  • a cover page for each journal article that includes the article’s title and information regarding the journal to which it has been (or will be) submitted
  • each article in its entirety including references and appendices (articles should be judged by the POS committee to be equivalent to chapters in a traditional dissertation
    • content of articles should be identical to that submitted to journals)
    • if the articles have already been published, written permission extending reproduction and distribution rights to University Microfilms International must be submitted at the time of final deposit
  • a general summary discussing results as they apply to the larger problem detailed in the introduction
  • works cited for references not included in articles

Abstract

Whatever the dissertation structure, you will be asked to prepare an abstract of the dissertation. Abstracts of doctoral dissertations nationwide are available in the library. Actual dissertations may be available through interlibrary loan, depending on the policies of the lender.

4.3.6 RPC Final Oral Defense of the Dissertation (Final Oral Examination)

See the section on Graduation for more details and information on finishing up.

4.3.7 RPC Student Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes students in this program are expected to meet include:

  • Demonstrate understanding and application of theories, research methods, and concepts in rhetoric, professional communication, and multimodal composition.
  • Use a variety of technologies and media for designing and implementing effective, audience-centered communication.
  • Analyze and critique communication in a variety of organizational and public contexts.
  • Synthesize multiple historical and contemporary sources within research projects.
  • Design and produce scholarship that makes a significant contribution to the field.

Measures for evaluating a student’s success in meeting these objectives include: display of an ability to develop a clear and cogent argument using relevant evidence in coursework; annual reviews, portfolio, and comprehensive exams; and completion and defense of the dissertation.